Pharma Technology Focus – Issue 3 Out Now

19th July 2011 (Last Updated July 19th, 2011 18:30)

Better medicine: From needle-free to nanotechnology, new drug delivery systems are set to revolutionise medical treatment.

Pharma Technology Focus – Issue 3 Out Now
Drug delivery technologies are coming of age and attracting major investment.

Pharmaceutical companies and academic institutions worldwide are investing significant resources into the development of new drug delivery technologies. Driven by innovation and improved product features, the drug delivery market is forecast to attain significant growth in the coming years.

In this month's issue we put the spotlight on this industry sector, looking at research and new products in the pipeline, as well as the state of the global market for drug delivery systems and projected market developments in the coming years. We investigate progress in cutting-edge research fields such as biodegradable drug delivery systems and medical implants that could relieve patients of the misery of daily injections. We also look at the trend of drug-device convergence and the challenges for pharmaceutical and medical device companies in bringing combination drugs to the market.

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A New Era for Drug Delivery

Drug delivery technologies are coming of age and they are attracting major investment. We take a look at the areas that are seeing a massive research effort and could hold the key for medical breakthroughs.

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Special Delivery

The global drug delivery market is changing like never before. Driven by the introduction of technologies with improved product features, the sector is set to attain significant growth over the next five years, according to market analyst GlobalData.

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Money Where the Mouth Is

Accounting for more than half of the drug delivery market and valued at $49bn in 2010, the oral drugs sector is expected to continue its dominance over the next five years, GBI Research reports.

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Goodbye to Daily Injections?

Research suggests that biodegradable drug delivery systems could emerge as a promising new route for administering medication and relieve patients of the misery of daily injections. We find out when this approach, and other technology intended to revolutionise the use of medical implants, will be ready to hit the market.

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Mutually Beneficial

Like most businesses around the world, pharmaceutical and medical device companies are facing a growing demand to cut costs while developing ever more innovative products. Creating combination products is rapidly emerging as a key way to make an impact in a competitive market. We examine the success of drug-device convergence.

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Risky Business?

For most manufacturers, combination drugs are something of a brave new world when it comes to drug development – and bringing such products to market is far from easy. We talk to Fangdong Yin of Eli Lilly about the challenges for pharmaceutical and medical device companies, and ways to overcome them.

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Next Issue: Combating Counterfeits

Due to the global expansion of pharmaceutical markets, counterfeit drugs are a growing problem, not only in developing nations but even in 'premium markets' such as the US and Europe. Counterfeit medicines are threatening public health as well as the reputation of the legitimate pharmaceutical industry.

In next month's issue we investigate the extent of the problem and how the industry and health organisations are responding. We ask market analysts about the trends in counterfeits and speak to experts about security measures that can be taken at the packaging and labelling stages, as well as looking at tracking and end-to-end verification solutions that can help to prevent counterfeit products from infiltrating the pharmaceutical supply chain.

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