CellCentric starts Phase Ib/IIa trial of CCS1477

26th June 2018 (Last Updated June 26th, 2018 00:00)

CellCentric has begun a Phase Ib/IIa clinical trial of CCS1477 to treat late-stage prostate cancer after receiving regulatory approval from the UK’s Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).

CellCentric has begun a Phase Ib/IIa clinical trial of CCS1477 to treat late-stage prostate cancer after receiving regulatory approval from the UK’s Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).

The Institute of Cancer Research in London, UK, Regius professor and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust consultant medical oncologist Johann de Bono is the chief investigator of the trial, which seeks to enrol 120 patients.

During the first-in-man trial, CCS1477’s tolerability and efficacy will be evaluated for the treatment of late-stage prostate cancer.

CCS1477 will also be tested as a monotherapy, as well as in combination with Zytiga and Xtandi at a number of sites in the UK, including Sir Bobby Robson Cancer Trials Research Centre, Newcastle and Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast.

The trial is also expected to be expended to various sites in the US, including Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia.

"Targeting both the androgen receptor and its splice variants with a novel drug such as CCS1477 could prove to be a new and exciting way to treat this disease."

Bono said: “One of the largest areas of unmet need in prostate cancer is the growing number of men who become resistant to treatment with second-generation anti-hormonal drugs.

“Targeting both the androgen receptor and its splice variants with a novel drug such as CCS1477 could prove to be a new and exciting way to treat this disease.”

CCS1477 is a potent, selective, orally bioavailable inhibitor that features conserved bromodomains of twin histone acetyl transferase proteins, p300 and CBP.

Inhibition of p300/CBP can significantly reduce the expression of the drivers of late-stage prostate cancer; the androgen receptor (AR), AR-splice variants (AR-SV) and c-Myc.

Reducing AR-SV is said to address inherent or acquired resistance to current second generation anti-androgen treatments abiraterone (Zytiga), enzalutamide (Xtandi) and apalutamide (Erleada).