Immatics and Roche to trial combination therapy for solid tumours

27th February 2019 (Last Updated February 27th, 2019 00:00)

German biopharmaceutical company Immatics is set to study its investigational therapy IMA101 in combination with Roche’s Tecentriq (atezolizumab) drug for the treatment of solid cancers.

Immatics and Roche to trial combination therapy for solid tumours
Group of killer T cells (green and red) surrounding a cancer cell (blue, centre). Credit: Alex Ritter, Jennifer Lippincott Schwartz and Gillian Griffiths, National Institutes of Health.

German biopharmaceutical company Immatics is set to study its investigational therapy IMA101 in combination with Roche’s Tecentriq (atezolizumab) drug for the treatment of solid cancers.

Based on Immatics’ ACTolog approach, IMA101 is a personalised, multi-targeted autologous cell therapy intended for various advanced / metastatic solid tumours.

Tecentriq is a monoclonal antibody that binds to the PD-L1 protein and prevents its interaction with PD-1 and B7.1 receptors. The inhibition of PD-L1 is expected to activate T cells.

The drug holds approval in more than 50 countries, including the US, for previously treated metastatic non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer (mUC).

"We are extremely pleased that, in collaboration with our long-term partner, we are now combining this promising personalised cell therapy with atezolizumab."

In the latest trial, the potential synergistic effects of the IMA101 plus Tecentriq combination will be assessed. Atezolizumab is expected to boost IMA101’s ability to kill cancer cells by blocking inhibitory immune checkpoints.

The trial is scheduled to commence over the coming months under an amendment to the ACTolog IMA101-101 study, which is a Phase I trial designed to assess the safety and tolerability of IMA101 as a monotherapy or in combination with Tecentriq.

Primary endpoint of the Phase I trial is the incidence of adverse events.

The trial will also include secondary outcome measures such as incidence of successfully manufactured personalised T-cells per patient, peripheral T-cell persistence and incidence of clinical responders.

Immatics chief medical officer Stephen Eck said: “Our innovative ACTolog process allows us to utilise a patient’s own T cells to generate a targeted approach for treating solid tumours with increased safety and efficacy potential.

“We are extremely pleased that, in collaboration with our long-term partner, we are now combining this promising personalised cell therapy with atezolizumab.”

ACTolog T-cell products are produced from peripheral blood cells with distinct target selectivity.