LIDDS verifies NanoZolid for controlled release of cancer drugs

16th May 2018 (Last Updated May 16th, 2018 10:25)

Local Intelligent Drug Delivery System (LIDDS) has verified its NanoZolid technology as a subcutaneous depot for systemic delivery of pharmaceutically active drugs, intended to revolutionise the administration of cancer treatments.

LIDDS verifies NanoZolid for controlled release of cancer drugs
LIDDS has verified its NanoZolid technology as a subcutaneous depot for cancer treatments Credit: Max Pixel

Local Intelligent Drug Delivery System (LIDDS) has verified its NanoZolid technology as a subcutaneous depot for systemic delivery of pharmaceutically active drugs, intended to revolutionise the administration of cancer treatments.

On Monday the company announced animal data demonstrating the efficacy of NanoZolid, with two separate treatment groups demonstrating the two-week treatment to be well tolerated. The technology allowed for the controlled release of a nonsteroidal hormonal drug following a single subcutaneous injection, with stable and pharmacologically relevant plasma exposure levels observed over the two-week trial period.

The results support the use of NanoZolid as a subcutaneous drug delivery depot. Such findings offer a solution to common problems encountered with current dosing methods, with the controlled release of medication reducing adverse effects as compared to systemic treatment.

The majority of current cancer treatments are administered in tablet, injection or infusion form. Such an approach exposes the whole body to the medication, rather than the site specifically affected and thus raises the risk of adverse reactions to the drug. This is particularly common with immuno-oncology treatments, which work through stimulating the body’s immune system to attack cancer cells.

By contrast, NanoZolid allows for a locally administered treatment, for instance allowing medication to be injected directly into a tumour area. The technology allows for the long-term and adjusted release of the medication for up to six months and can be combined with both large and small pharmaceutical molecules.

LIDDS’s most advanced candidate is the prostate cancer product Liproca Depot, which contains the anti-hormonal drug 2-hydroxyflutamide and is currently at the Phase IIb trial stage. The platform allows 2-hydroxyflutamide to be injected directly into the tumour region, after which it is slowly released into the body over six months. It is estimated that this allows the tissue concentration to increase as much as 40,000 times that of oral treatment.

The company has active development projects where NanoZolid is combined with antiandrogens, cytostatics and immunoactive agents. It has announced plans to continue examining the drug types that can be formulated, as well as the duration of release.

LIDDS’s proprietary drug platforms can be used to develop locally acting drugs for a variety of tumours such as prostate, lung, ovarian, liver, brain, abdominal cavity, spine, head / neck, bone, uterus, kidney and bladder.