NeoImmuneTech starts new trial of HyLeukin-7 for cancer

30th May 2018 (Last Updated May 30th, 2018 00:00)

NeoImmuneTech has commenced its first clinical trial in the US to evaluate HyLeukin-7 for the treatment of cancer.

NeoImmuneTech has commenced its first clinical trial in the US to evaluate HyLeukin-7 for the treatment of cancer.

The trial aims to determine HyLeukin-7’s effect on lymphocyte counts in patients with brain cancer following radiation.

Scheduled to enrol up to 75 patients, the trial also intends to identify the safety and efficacy of different doses of HyLeukin-7.

The trial will be carried out as part of an agreement with the Adult Brain Tumor Consortium (ABTC) in the US and is supported by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) as a joint study of the Cancer Immunotherapy Trials Network (CITN) for biomarker analysis.

NeoImmuneTech CEO Se Hwan Yang said: “It is the first time that NeoImmuneTech’s HyLeukin-7 has cleared the US IND for clinical trials and is an important milestone for our global clinical development.

"It is the first time that NeoImmuneTech’s HyLeukin-7 has cleared the US IND for clinical trials and is an important milestone for our global clinical development."

“We plan to continue expanding HyLeukin-7’s target indications and to initiate several additional research collaborations to study it in combination with global immuno-oncology product.”

HyLeukin-7, an immunotherapeutic agent for cancer patients, is currently under development by a partnership of NeoImmuneTech and Genexine.

It is a T-cell amplifier featuring a covalently linked homodimer of engineered Interleukin-7 (IL-7) molecule, biologically fused with a long-acting platform known as hyFc.

HyLeukin-7 can be used as ‘IO enabling’ therapy to harness T-cell immunity in combination with the existing cancer treatments such as anti-PD-(L)1 agents or chemo / radiotherapy.

In addition, NeoImmuneTech and Genexine are teaming up for three Phase lb/lla clinical trials of HyLeukin-7 in advanced solid tumours and glioblastoma in the US and Korea.