AbbVie presents SURVEYOR study results for its investigational HCV regimen

16th November 2015 (Last Updated November 16th, 2015 18:30)

Biopharmaceutical company AbbVie has presented data from the SURVEYOR studies of ABT-493, an NS3/4A protease inhibitor, and ABT-530, an NS5A inhibitor.

Abbvie

Biopharmaceutical company AbbVie has presented data from the SURVEYOR studies of ABT-493, an NS3/4A protease inhibitor, and ABT-530, an NS5A inhibitor.

ABT-493 is the result of an ongoing partnership between AbbVie and Enanta Pharmaceuticals for HCV protease inhibitors and regimens, including protease inhibitors.

The inhibitor is being developed for use in combination with AbbVie's other investigational medicines for the treatment of hepatitis C.

At 12 weeks post-treatment (SVR12), the data showed high rates of sustained virologic response in non-cirrhotic patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection.

SVR12 rates were 97-100% in genotype 1 (GT1), 96-100% in genotype 2 (GT2) and 83-94% in genotype 3 (GT3) patients after 12 weeks of treatment.

In the SURVEYOR-I study non-cirrhotic GT1 chronic HCV patients, who received a shorter eight-week treatment, achieved an SVR12 rate of 97%.

AbbVie chief scientific officer Dr Michael Severino said: "The SURVEYOR trials offer important new information about the potential to treat patients with chronic hepatitis C across multiple genotypes with our two direct-acting antiviral investigational regimen.

"AbbVie's ongoing hepatitis C research program demonstrates our commitment to make a remarkable impact on the lives of HCV patients."

SURVEYOR-I and SURVEYOR-II are ongoing Phase II clinical studies to assess the safety and efficacy of ABT-493 and ABT-530, with or without ribavirin (RBV), for eight to 12 weeks.

According to AbbVie, data in non-cirrhotic patients with GT4, GT5, and GT6 chronic HCV infection will be presented in the near future.

A multinational Phase III programme, initiated earlier in November, will evaluate ABT-493 and ABT-530 in genotypes 1 through 6.


Image: Electron micrographs of hepatitis C virus purified from cell culture. Photo: courtesy of Charles Rice / Center for the Study of Hepatitis C, The Rockefeller University.