Actinium initiates Phase I trial of Actimab-M to treat multiple myeloma

7th February 2017 (Last Updated February 7th, 2017 18:30)

US-based biopharmaceutical firm Actinium Pharmaceuticals has initiated a Phase I clinical trial of Actimab-M to treat patients with multiple myeloma.

US-based biopharmaceutical firm Actinium Pharmaceuticals has initiated a Phase I clinical trial of Actimab-M to treat patients with multiple myeloma.

Actimab-M is developed using the CD-33 targeting monoclonal antibody HuM-195 in combination with the alpha-particle emitter actinium 225. The antigen CD33 is reported to be present on the malignant cells of the disease.

The multicentre, open-label, dose-escalation Phase I trial will evaluate the drug in patients with progressing disease after three prior multiple myeloma treatment regimens or are refractory to QUAD (Caflizomib, Lenalidomide, Pomalidomide, Dexamethason).

Actinium Pharmaceuticals executive chairman Sandesh Seth said: “We are incredibly excited to see the initiation of this trial for Actimab-M in multiple myeloma.

"Not only does this mark the beginning of the expansion of our clinical pipeline beyond AML, it also demonstrates the broad applicability of our radioimmunotherapy technologies that we intend to progress into new indications and patient populations.

"We are incredibly excited to see the initiation of this trial for Actimab-M in multiple myeloma."

"Furthermore, this reinforces Actinium’s commitment to developing therapies for patients with unmet needs. We look forward to providing updates as this trial progresses.”

Multiple Myeloma is a type of blood cancer caused due to malignant transformation of white blood cells called plasmocytes, which accumulate in the bone marrow leading to bone and kidney damage.

The trial will evaluate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), adverse events, response rates, progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS).

Actimab-A is being studied further in a Phase II clinical trial of newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients older than 60.


Image: Skull X-Ray showing multiple lucencies due to multiple myloma. Photo: courtesy of James Heilman / Wikipedia.