Psoriasis drug demonstrates positive outcome in two Phase III trials

7th June 2017 (Last Updated June 7th, 2017 18:30)

A biologic agent known as tildrakizumab has demonstrated a positive outcome in two Phase III trials conducted by Harvard Medical School’s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre (BIDMC) in the US to treat patients with plaque psoriasis.

A biologic agent known as tildrakizumab has demonstrated a positive outcome in two Phase III trials conducted by Harvard Medical School’s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre (BIDMC) to treat patients with plaque psoriasis.

Tildrakizumab is based on the body’s natural molecules such as antibodies and targets a specific pathway.

The results showed that tildrakizumab is efficacious and well-tolerated in moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis patients.

The parallel, double-blind, randomised, controlled Phase III trials evaluated the ability of 100mg or 200mg of tildrakizumab to clear up and control the disease in more than 1,800 patients.

The reSURFACE 1 and reSURFACE 2 trials were performed at 250 sites in Austria, Australia, Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Poland, the UK and the US.

"The breakthrough here is that we have continued to refine our treatments to those that are likely to be most effective against psoriasis but less likely to affect other important pathways at the same time."

BIDMC Harvard Medical Faculty Physicians (HMFP) president and CEO Alexa Kimball said: “In these two trials, we tested whether this new, very targeted approach to a selected part of the inflammatory pathway would be effective in treating psoriasis, and it was, dramatically so.”

The data showed that 65% of the patients in the trial with 30% of their body covered with psoriasis, experienced a complete skin clearance or had almost clear skin at the end of the treatment period.

The clearance represented a 75% improvement when compared to 10% by placebo, measured using the standard psoriasis area severity index (PASI).

Kimball further added: “The breakthrough here is that we have continued to refine our treatments to those that are likely to be most effective against psoriasis but less likely to affect other important pathways at the same time.”