Report: Major depressive disorder market to grow at CAGR of 6.1% over next ten years

13th October 2016 (Last Updated October 13th, 2016 18:30)

The global market for major depressive disorder (MDD) is anticipated to grow at a substantial compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 6.1% over the next ten years, according to a report by GlobalData.

The global market for major depressive disorder (MDD) is anticipated to grow at a substantial compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 6.1% over the next ten years, according to a report by GlobalData.

Titled ‘PharmaPoint: Major Depressive Disorder - Global Drug Forecast and Market Assessment to 2025’, the report forecasts that the market for the disorder, which includes depression and seasonal affective disorder, will grow from $3.2 billion in 2015 to $5.8 billion by 2025 across seven major markets.

The markets considered for the forecast include the US, UK, France, Germany, Italy, Spain and Japan.

Market growth will be driven by the increasing prevalence of the disorder, introduction of late-stage pipeline products, and the growth of atypical antipsychotics such as Otsuka / Bristol-Myers Squibb’s Abilify, AstraZeneca’s Seroquel XR, and Otsuka / Lundbeck’s Rexulti.

"GlobalData expects these late-stage pipeline products to drive combined sales of $877 million by 2025 in the seven major markets."

According to GlobalData neurology and ophthalmology analyst Christos Michaelides, Otsuka, Abilify, Seroquel XR and Rexulti will jointly account for 39% of the global MDD market, generating $2.2 billion in sales in 2025.

“Although Abilify and Seroquel will experience some generic erosion over the forecast period, Rexulti will continue to drive sales upwards following its expected launches in the US and Europe in 2018,” explains Michaelides.

 “GlobalData expects these late-stage pipeline products to drive combined sales of $877 million by 2025 in the seven major markets.

"The most promising product will be Janssen’s esketamine, which could become a new therapy option for patients who do not respond to atypical antipsychotics and available antidepressant therapies,” Michaelides adds.