Report: Venous Thromboembolism therapeutics market expected to rise to $3.7bn by 2025

4th August 2016 (Last Updated August 4th, 2016 18:30)

An increase in sales within the venous thromboembolism (VTE) primary prophylaxis space is expected to drive the growth in the VTE market from $2.8bn in 2015 to $3.7bn by 2025, according to a report by GlobalData.

An increase in sales in the venous thromboembolism (VTE) primary prophylaxis space is expected to drive the growth in the VTE market from $2.8bn in 2015 to $3.7bn by 2025, according to a report by GlobalData.

Titled ‘PharmaPoint: Venous Thromboembolism – Global Drug Forecast and Market Analysis to 2025’, the report forecasts the VTE market, including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 2.89% across the seven major markets of the US, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, the UK and Japan.

The VTE primary prophylaxis space is specifically projected to grow from $2.4bn in 2015 to $3.5bn by 2025, at a CAGR of 4.01%.

Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) will be the key driving force behind the anticipated growth in the VTE market.

"Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) will be the key driving force behind the anticipated growth in the VTE market."

NOACs require fewer dose adjustments and avoid routine blood monitoring, proving their safety and efficacy over warfarin, an established anticoagulant in the market. They also have fewer drug-drug interactions and lesser dietary effects compared to warfarin.

NOACs such as Pradaxa, Xarelto, Eliquis and Savaysa provide physicians with a number of treatment options, which can be administered depending upon a patient’s risk profile.

Despite the advantages provided by NOACs, a transformational therapy is required to drive growth in the VTE market, according to GlobalData analyst Michela McMullan, Ph.D.

According to McMullan, a drug which can be administered orally, once-daily, and having better renal clearance can drive growth and fetch a premium price in the market. She commented that it should not require routine monitoring and be safe enough to be administered to patients in all stages of renal impairment.