Tilray and University of British Columbia begin Phase II trial of medical cannabis in Canada

7th September 2016 (Last Updated September 7th, 2016 18:30)

Canadian-based medical cannabis producer Tilray and University of British Columbia have begun patient enrolment in Canada’s first Phase II clinical trial of medical cannabis to treat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Canadian-based medical cannabis producer Tilray and University of British Columbia have begun patient enrolment in Canada’s first Phase II clinical trial of medical cannabis to treat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Cannabis plant belongs to the family of Cannabaceae of the nettle order, which is believed to be effective in soothing nausea, increase appetite, relieve pain and reduce epileptic seizures.

Claimed as one of the world’s first large-scale clinical trials, the Phase II, triple blind, placebo-controlled, randomised, crossover clinical trial is intended to determine the safety and efficacy of three potencies of medical cannabis to treat chronic, treatment-resistant PTSD symptoms resulting from a traumatic event.

"The trial will enrol 42 Canadians diagnosed with PTSD due to trauma faced during military service, as a first responder or police, or as the result of violence and / or sexual assault."

The trial will enrol 42 Canadians diagnosed with PTSD due to trauma faced during military service, as a first responder or police, or as the result of violence and / or sexual assault.

Tilray clinical research director Catherine Jacobson said: “We are providing physicians and researchers with cannabis-derived study drugs that meet rigorous regulatory standards for human trials, and which are based on studies indicating a high likelihood of success in treating specific diseases and disease-related symptoms.

“Methodologically sound research resulting from these trials is the best tool we can offer physicians to further understand the effectiveness of medical cannabis treatment for the myriad symptoms associated with conditions such as PTSD and epilepsy, as well as those stemming from other treatments such as chemotherapy.”

Tilray has also partnered with The New South Wales (NSW) Government, the University of Sydney and Chris O`Brien Lifehouse in Australia to develop treatment for nausea and vomiting in chemotherapy.


Image: Cannabis sativa leaf. Photo: courtesy of JonRichfield.