NIH extends NeuroNEXT neurological clinical research for five years

26th July 2018 (Last Updated July 26th, 2018 00:00)

The US National Institutes of Health (NIH) has renewed the Excellence in Neuroscience Clinical Trials (NeuroNEXT) research programme, which supports the streamline of Phase II clinical trials for brain disorders, to extend the programme for five additional years.

The US National Institutes of Health (NIH) has renewed the Excellence in Neuroscience Clinical Trials (NeuroNEXT) research programme, which supports the streamline of Phase II clinical trials for brain disorders, to extend the programme for five additional years.

The renewal will see the joining of various new centres in the NeuroNEXT programme.

NIH unit National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) supports the programme, which was launched in 2011 to further efficient the neuroscience clinical trials and to help increase the number of treatments that get into clinical practice.

NINDS programme director Robin Conwit said: “One of the advantages of NeuroNEXT, and something that makes it unique, is the network’s ability to quickly mobilise a group of specialists from a certain disease area to initiate a clinical study when opportunities emerge for trials.

“The structure of NeuroNEXT, with its broad focus across neuroscience clinical studies, has the potential to reach many individuals who are affected by brain disorders.”

"The structure of NeuroNEXT, with its broad focus across neuroscience clinical studies, has the potential to reach many individuals who are affected by brain disorders."

NeuroNEXT is expected to promote partnerships between academic centres, disease foundations, and industry.

Inexperienced researcher can apply to the NeuroNEXT programme and receive resources available at the participating centres of the programme if he/she wishes to conduct a Phase II clinical trial.

NINDS programme director Codrin Lungu said: “To date, nine clinical trials currently in various stages have been implemented in the NeuroNEXT network, showing that this innovative approach to research can help expedite clinical research and help get treatments to patients faster.

“We are thrilled to continue working with the sites that have been participating in the network, and we look forward to collaborating with the eight sites that will be joining the programme.”

NINDS primarily provides funding for research on the brain and nervous system.