Survey finds downward trend in use of eClinical technologies

25th September 2019 (Last Updated December 23rd, 2019 08:27)

A new global survey commissioned by Oracle Health Sciences has found that investigational sites are facing challenges in adopting eClinical technologies due to disjointed techniques and complexity.

A new global survey commissioned by Oracle Health Sciences has found that investigational sites are facing challenges in adopting eClinical technologies due to disjointed techniques and complexity.

The ‘Impact Assessment of eClinical Technologies and Industry Initiatives on Sites’ survey was performed by the Society for Clinical Research Sites (SCRS).

Findings revealed a downward trend in satisfaction with existing eClinical settings during trials. This is negatively impacting the interest of sites in new industry initiatives and trial designs, Oracle noted.

The survey showed the availability of new trial designs and technologies intended to improve the site and patient experience.

However, sites are apprehensive regarding the additional burden associated with these technology changes, such as training, complicated login processes, and data duplication.

According to one-third of respondents, current eClinical solutions do not meet the operational requirements of their site.

Though technologies and initiatives are available to address sites’ concerns, 70% of respondents do not intend to use them because of high costs and complicated processes for deployment.

A majority of respondents said that a single point of data entry and single sign-on could help streamline processes and avoid redundant data entry.

Furthermore, 48% of investigative sites have or plan to join site networks in order to increase their chance of being chosen for clinical studies.

Joining site networks is expected to improve trial access and site profile, as well as enhance cycle time efficiencies and technology access.

SCRS president Casey Orvin said: “There are significant barriers to entry for new sites, which is concerning given the one and done syndrome plaguing the industry, which means a site completes a trial and does not pursue future studies.

“Site networks can help to reduce some of these burdens by standardising procedures and enabling new sites to conduct studies, particularly in underrepresented urban areas and population clusters.

“Sponsors and technology vendors can help by simplifying the technology environment in which sites must work to participate in clinical research.”

Apart from eClinical technologies, the survey also investigated the effect of a patient-centric study design.