US PhRMA announces clinical trial diversity principles

17th November 2020 (Last Updated November 17th, 2020 18:12)

The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) in the US has announced industry-wide principles on clinical trial diversity, with focus on four main areas.

US PhRMA announces clinical trial diversity principles
Clinical trial diversity better reflects intended treatment populations for different medicines and therapeutics. Credit: Blake Patterson.

The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) in the US has announced industry-wide principles on clinical trial diversity, with focus on four main areas.

Approved by the PhRMA Board of Directors, these first-ever principles are set to come into force in April next year.

The main areas of focus are building trust and acknowledging the mistrust of clinical trials within black and brown communities, and minimising barriers to clinical trial access.

Other focus points include use of real-world data for improving information on diverse populations beyond product approval and also on diversity and inclusion in clinical trial participation.

PhRMA president and CEO Stephen Ubl said: “The industry’s new clinical trial diversity principles are an important step toward greater health equity.

“We are addressing issues of mistrust and working to reduce systemic issues that deter communities of color from participating in clinical trials, so that those patients who want to participate.”

Clinical trial diversity is critical to health equity for Black and Brown communities and better reflects intended treatment populations for different medicines and therapeutics.

PhRMA said in a statement: “With the voluntary adoption of these industry-wide principles by PhRMA member companies, we are pledging to work on addressing the systemic issues that deter people from participating in clinical trials.”

Biopharmaceutical research companies in the US that are represented through PhRMA, discover and develop medicines that enable patients to live longer.

The member companies of the association have invested nearly $1 trillion since 2000 in search for new treatments and cures.