Report: Haemophilia A and B market set to reach $8bn by 2026

6th July 2017 (Last Updated July 6th, 2017 18:30)

The haemophilia A and B market is projected to grow from $6.7bn in 2016 to $8bn in 2026 at a compound annual growth rate of 1.8%, according to a report by GlobalData.

Report: Haemophilia A and B market set to reach $8bn by 2026

The haemophilia A and B market is projected to grow moderately from $6.7bn in 2016 to $8bn in 2026 at a compound annual growth rate of 1.8%, according to a report by GlobalData.

Titled ‘PharmaPoint: Haemophilia A and B – Global Drug Forecast and Market Analysis to 2026’, the report covers the haemophilia A and B market across the US, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, the UK and Japan.

The rise in paediatric prophylaxis and adult haemophilia A and B rates are driving growth in the industry, along with the launch and increase in uptake of new long-acting factors and alternative coagulation promoters (ACPs).

The haemophilia A and B market is primarily dominated by comparable short-acting recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) treatment options. Since 2014, the launch of long-acting rFVIII products was expected to stimulate growth in the market.

The transition towards these drugs, however, has been slow as they did not offer a meaningful reduction in dosing frequency for haemophilia A when compared to the long-acting recombinant FIX (clotting factor IX) for haemophilia B, explains Chiara Marchetti, PhD, Healthcare Analyst for GlobalData.

"The rise in paediatric prophylaxis and adult haemophilia A and B rates are driving growth in the industry, along with the launch and increase in uptake of new long-acting factors and alternative coagulation promoters (ACPs)."

Furthermore, the future prospects of long-acting rFVIII drugs appear to be bleak as they are anticipated to be replaced by ACPs, which will enter the market in 2019. The molecular structure of ACPs and their subcutaneous administration provide bleeding protection along with a reduction in dosing frequency.

The major ACPs expected to be launched include Roche’s emicizumab in the haemophilia A market and Alnylam / Genzyme’s fitusiran in the haemophilia A and B markets.

The report predicts the pricing strategy of the new drugs to play a major role in their success due to the constantly rising costs associated with haemophilia care. The report also adds that Roche will seek a limited premium for emicizumab over the existing long-acting rFVIII drugs.

Emicizumab is expected to emerge as a blockbuster in the haemophilia market due to the high level of unmet need in the inhibitor segment of haemophilia A, as well as achieve projected sales of $2.6bn in 2026.