Amarantus MANF demonstrates superiority over GDNF in rat model of Parkinson’s disease

28th October 2012 (Last Updated October 28th, 2012 18:30)

Amarantus BioSciences' anti-apoptosis therapeutic protein, MANF, has demonstrated superiority over glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in a neurorestoration 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of Parkinson's disease.

Amarantus BioSciences' anti-apoptosis therapeutic protein, MANF, has demonstrated superiority over glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in a neurorestoration 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of Parkinson's disease.

When delivered directly to the substantia nigra, the primary brain region associated with Parkinson's, MANF significantly reduced behavioural deficits in the model, while GDNF did not.

Amarantus chief scientist and the National Institutes of Health Neurotrophic Factors Group former head Dr John Commissiong said the data demonstrate that MANF had a strong positive and restorative effect on the behaviour of animals in this pre-clinical Parkinson's disease study, whereas GDNF had no such effect.

"The localisation of the drug treatment in this study is critical because, as Parkinson's disease progresses, dopaminergic nerve terminals typically retract from the striatum towards their cell bodies in the substantia nigra, resulting in the disruption of the basal ganglia network that is responsible for proper motor function," Commissiong said.

In the studies, 6-OHDA was primarily injected into the striatum on one side of each rat's brain, enabling dopaminergic terminals to retract from the striatum towards the substantia nigra, thereby creating Parkinson's-like behavioural symptoms.

"When delivered directly to the substantia nigra, the primary brain region associated with Parkinson's, MANF significantly reduced behavioural deficits in the model, while GDNF did not."

Two weeks after the administration of 6-OHDA, MANF and GDNF at the optimal dosing level of 10µg were administered into the substantia nigra of separate groups of rats.

The studies observed that four weeks following MANF treatment, behavioural deficits were reduced by 43% and six weeks following MANF treatment, behavioural deficits were reduced by 53%.

Four weeks following GDNF treatment, behavioural deficits were reduced by 16%, and six weeks following GDNF treatment, behavioural deficits increased by 20%.

Amarantus president and CEO Gerald Commissiong said; "The data we now have validates the approach we have been taking over the last several years, and we believe that it will allow us to attract the interest of investment firms and potential partners who will be able to now characterise the substantial opportunity our technology represents."