Precision’s prospective trial shows 65% overall survival in recurrent ovarian cancer patients

19th August 2013 (Last Updated August 19th, 2013 18:30)

Life-science company Precision Therapeutics has reported positive results in a prospective clinical trial which was carried out in conjunction with Yale University School of Medicine in recurrent ovarian cancer patients treated with chemotherapy.

ovarian cancer

Life-science company Precision Therapeutics has reported positive results in a prospective clinical trial which was carried out in conjunction with Yale University School of Medicine in recurrent ovarian cancer patients treated with chemotherapy.

Conducted at more than 30 additional cancer centres across the nation, patients with recurrent ovarian cancer in prospective clinical trial demonstrated a 65% improvement in overall survival.

According to the study, recurrent ovarian cancer patients treated with a chemotherapy identified as sensitive by the ChemoFx drug response assay lived 14-months longer compared to patients treated by non-sensitive chemotherapies classified by ChemoFx.

Furthermore, ChemoFx was able to identify at least one sensitive chemotherapy agent for more than half of the recurrent ovarian cancer patients studied.

"This clinical study is a landmark for the treatment of ovarian cancer because it is the first prospective data that definitively shows that a personalised diagnostic test can make a significant clinical impact by improving overall survival by 65% in women with this devastating cancer."

Study lead investigator and Yale School of Medicine gynecologic oncology section chief and ObGyn and Reproductive Sciences professor Dr Thomas Rutherford said, "This clinical study is a landmark for the treatment of ovarian cancer because it is the first prospective data that definitively shows that a personalised diagnostic test can make a significant clinical impact by improving overall survival by 65% in women with this devastating cancer."

One of 15 study-designated standard chemotherapy treatments was administered to 262 evaluable patients.

When blinded to the results of the assay, physicians treated 25% of patients with a sensitive chemotherapy.

More than half (52%) of the study participants showed at least one assay-sensitive chemotherapy from which they could have benefited if the physician have been assay-informed, according to the company.

Thus, data indicate that if ChemoFx results were used by physicians before treatment, the possibility of number of patients receiving sensitive treatments, and thereby experiencing improved survival outcomes, could have more than doubled.

For patients treated with sensitive chemotherapies, median progression free survival improved by 50% as identified by ChemoFx compared to those treated with non-sensitive agents.

Consistent association with assay response was noted in both platinum-sensitive and platinum-resistant tumours and was independent of other covariates in multivariate analysis, in addition to statistically significant 14-month improvement in median overall survival.


Image: Micrograph of a low malignant potential mucinous ovarian tumour. H&E stain. Photo courtesy of Nephron.