THE UNIVERSITY OF BOLTON is set to conduct research to develop artificial fibres that could be used to repair or replace injured human tendons.

Bolton is part of a consortium of international universities, along with National University of Ireland (NUI), Galway and Hebrew University in Jerusalem, that secured a €1.5m (£1.3m) grant from the Marie Curie Sponsorship Programme for research into functional tendon regeneration using loaded biomimetic scaffolds.

The consortium will be making artificial tendon fibres made of materials including fibrous proteins such as collagen.

Artificial tendon fibres could be used to replace or repair damaged tendons by being woven or braided into the body.

"Artificial tendon fibres could be used to replace or repair damaged tendons by being woven or braided into the body."

Bolton will be allocated approximately €250,000 (£214,000) of the funding.

University of Bolton project leader Dr Moshen Miraftab said; "Given the importance of such an investigation and practical application of its outcome, success of this research could lead to further Pan-European project partnerships for the University."

Two fully-funded researchers and a senior researcher from the University of Bolton have been seconded to Ireland-based Vornia, a spin-off company from NUI that designs and develops biomaterials for medical purposes and commercialisation.

Tendons are the fibrous bands that connect muscle to bone, and are difficult to treat or repair if damaged.